Wednesday, January 11, 2006

Will

Ed Schools vs. Education : "The surest, quickest way to add quality to primary and secondary education would be addition by subtraction: Close all the schools of education."

4 comments:

Atlas said...

This quote is from the will column is at least as good as the first paragraph:

Mac Donald says "the central educational fallacy of our time," which dates from the Progressive Era of the early 20th century, is "that one can think without having anything to think about."

Damn John Dewey, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and sitting in hippie circles and talking about feelings.

Today I heard about a new study that concluded that the percentage of Americans that could name all 9 OR just 8 of the members of the Supreme Court is statistically insignificant, less than one half of one percent. 57% could not name even one.

Paul said...

Separate the sexes at the middle and high school levels.
Uniforms.
Revoke long-term tenure.
Institute some form of merit pay.
Check out John Stossel's column from yesterday (townhall), he makes a good point that the government funds should follow the students. Those funds should be used at the parents' discretion.

Paul said...

I am preparing for national board certification right now (for the money). To quote Tom, "Oh my God." The readings, qualifications, assignments, etc. are chock full of those progressive buzzwords. Equality, tolerance, compassion, understanding, caring, fairness. Very little mention of content knowledge.

greg said...

So true. My educational training (excluding my undergrad and graduate training in US History which I now teach) consisted of classes of which at least one-third stressed the point that it was OK to be Hispanic and we as teachers shouldn't pick on people because they are different than us. I'm not joking. At least 3 "classes" that told us that not all Hispanic students were from Mexico, not all Hispanic students were in gangs and not all Hispanic students were recent immigrants. I had to take one class on developing history curriculum. One.